Carlos del Rio, MD



<p><span><b>Carlos del Rio, MD</b> is Hubert Professor and Chair of the Hubert Department of Global Health and Professor of Epidemiology at the Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University and Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. He is also co-Director of the Emory Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) and Director of the Emory AIDS International Training and Research Program. Dr. del Rio is a native of Mexico where he was Executive Director of the National AIDS Council of Mexico (CONASIDA, the Federal agency of the Mexican Government responsible for AIDS Policy throughout Mexico), from 1992 through 1996.</span></p> <p>Dr. del Rio’s research focuses on the early diagnosis, access to care, compliance with antiretrovirals and the prevention of HIV infection.&nbsp; He has worked for over a decade with hard-to-reach populations including substance abuse users to improve outcomes of those infected with HIV and to prevent infection with those at risk. He has also worked on emerging infections such West Nile Virus infection as pandemic influenza and was a member of the WHO Influenza A(H1N1) Clinical Advisory Group and of the CDC Influenza A(H1N1) Task Force during the 2009 pandemic.</p> <p> </p> <p><span>Dr. del Rio is a Member of the Board of Directors of the International Antiviral Society-USA (IAS-USA) and the HIVMA of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). He is a also a member of the Advisory Committee on HIV, Hepatitis and STD Prevention and Treatment of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Health Resources and Services Administration. He is Editor-in-Chief of <i>NEJM Journal Watch HIV/AIDS</i>, Senior Clinical Editor for <i>AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses </i>and<i> </i>member of the editorial board of <i>Journal of AIDS</i>, <i>Women, Children and HIV</i>, and <i>Global Public Health</i>. Dr. del Rio has co-authored 30 book chapters and over 300 scientific papers.&nbsp;</span></p>


Ebola Virus Disease: An Evolving Epidemic

Ebola Virus Disease: An Evolving Epidemic