Introduction to Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science Specialization

Started Sep 18

Introduction to Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science Specialization

Build a Foundation for Your Career in IT

Master the math powering our lives and prepare for your software engineer or security analyst career

About This Specialization

Discrete Math is needed to see mathematical structures in the object you work with, and understand their properties. This ability is important for software engineers, data scientists, security and financial analysts (it is not a coincidence that math puzzles are often used for interviews). We cover the basic notions and results (combinatorics, graphs, probability, number theory) that are universally needed. To deliver techniques and ideas in discrete mathematics to the learner we extensively use interactive puzzles specially created for this specialization. To bring the learners experience closer to IT-applications we incorporate programming examples, problems and projects in our courses.

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courses
5 courses

Follow the suggested order or choose your own.

projects
Projects

Designed to help you practice and apply the skills you learn.

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Certificates

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Projects Overview

Courses
Beginner Specialization.
No prior experience required.
  1. COURSE 1

    What is a Proof?

    Current session: Sep 18 — Nov 6.
    Commitment
    6 weeks, 2–5 hours/week
    Subtitles
    English

    About the Course

    There is a perceived barrier to mathematics: proofs. In this course we will try to convince you that this barrier is more frightening than prohibitive: most proofs are easy to understand if explained correctly, and often they are even fun. We provide an accompanied excursion in the “proof zoo” showing you examples of techniques of different kind applied to different topics. We use some puzzles as examples, not because they are “practical”, but because discussing them we learn important reasoning and problem solving techniques that are useful. We hope you enjoy playing with the puzzles and inventing/understandings the proofs. As prerequisites we assume only basic math (e.g., we expect you to know what is a square or how to add fractions), basic programming in python (functions, loops, recursion), common sense and curiosity. Our intended audience are all people that work or plan to work in IT, starting from motivated high school students.
  2. COURSE 2

    Combinatorics and Probability

    Current session: Sep 18 — Nov 6.
    Commitment
    6 weeks, 3-5 hours/week
    Subtitles
    English

    About the Course

    Counting is one of the basic mathematically related tasks we encounter on a day to day basis. The main question here is the following. If we need to count something, can we do anything better than just counting all objects one by one? Do we need to create a list of all phone numbers to ensure that there are enough phone numbers for everyone? Is there a way to tell that our algorithm will run in a reasonable time before implementing and actually running it? All these questions are addressed by a mathematical field called Combinatorics. In this course we discuss most standard combinatorial settings that can help to answer questions of this type. We will especially concentrate on developing the ability to distinguish these settings in real life and algorithmic problems. This will help the learner to actually implement new knowledge. Apart from that we will discuss recursive technique for counting that is important for algorithmic implementations. One of the main `consumers’ of Combinatorics is Probability Theory. This area is connected with numerous sides of life, on one hand being an important concept in everyday life and on the other hand being an indispensable tool in such modern and important fields as Statistics and Machine Learning. In this course we will concentrate on providing the working knowledge of basics of probability and a good intuition in this area. The practice shows that such an intuition is not easy to develop. In the end of the course we will create a program that successfully plays a tricky and very counterintuitive dice game. As prerequisites we assume only basic math (e.g., we expect you to know what is a square or how to add fractions), basic programming in python (functions, loops, recursion), common sense and curiosity. Our intended audience are all people that work or plan to work in IT, starting from motivated high school students.
  3. COURSE 3

    Introduction to Graph Theory

    Current session: Sep 18 — Oct 30.
    Commitment
    5 weeks, 3-5 hours/week
    Subtitles
    English

    About the Course

    We invite you to a fascinating journey into Graph Theory — an area which connects the elegance of painting and the rigor of mathematics; is simple, but not unsophisticated. Graph Theory gives us, both an easy way to pictorially represent many major mathematical results, and insights into the deep theories behind them. In this course, among other intriguing applications, we will see how GPS systems find shortest routes, how engineers design integrated circuits, how biologists assemble genomes, why a political map can always be colored using a few colors. We will study Ramsey Theory which proves that in a large system, complete disorder is impossible! By the end of the course, we will implement an algorithm which finds an optimal assignment of students to schools. This algorithm, developed by David Gale and Lloyd S. Shapley, was later recognized by the conferral of Nobel Prize in Economics. As prerequisites we assume only basic math (e.g., we expect you to know what is a square or how to add fractions), basic programming in python (functions, loops, recursion), common sense and curiosity. Our intended audience are all people that work or plan to work in IT, starting from motivated high school students.
  4. COURSE 4

    Number Theory and Cryptography

    Starts October 2017
    Subtitles
    English

    About the Course

    We all learn numbers from the childhood. Some of us like to count, others hate it, but any person uses numbers everyday to buy things, pay for services, estimated time and necessary resources. People have been wondering about numbers’ properties for thousands of years. And for thousands of years it was more or less just a game that was only interesting for pure mathematicians. Famous 20th century mathematician G.H. Hardy once said “The Theory of Numbers has always been regarded as one of the most obviously useless branches of Pure Mathematics”. Just 30 years after his death, an algorithm for encryption of secret messages was developed using achievements of number theory. It was called RSA after the names of its authors, and its implementation is probably the most frequently used computer program in the word nowadays. Without it, nobody would be able to make secure payments over the internet, or even log in securely to e-mail and other personal services. In this short course, we will make the whole journey from the foundation to RSA in 4 weeks. By the end, you will be able to apply the basics of the number theory to encrypt and decrypt messages, and to break the code if one applies RSA carelessly. You will even pass a cryptographic quest! As prerequisites we assume only basic math (e.g., we expect you to know what is a square or how to add fractions), basic programming in python (functions, loops, recursion), common sense and curiosity. Our intended audience are all people that work or plan to work in IT, starting from motivated high school students.
  5. COURSE 5

    Solving Delivery Problem

    Starts November 2017
    Commitment
    3 weeks of study, 2–5 hours/week
    Subtitles
    English

    About the Course

    We’ll implement together an efficient program for a problem needed by delivery companies all over the world millions times per day — the travelling salesman problem. The goal in this problem is to visit all the given places as quickly as possible. How to find an optimal solution to this problem quickly? We still don’t have provably efficient algorithms for this difficult computational problem and this is the essence of the P versus NP problem, the most important open question in Computer Science. Still, we’ll implement several efficient solutions for real world instances of the travelling salesman problem. While designing these solutions, we will rely heavily on the material learned in the courses of the specialization: proof techniques, combinatorics, probability, graph theory. We’ll see several examples of using discrete mathematics ideas to get more and more efficient solutions.

Creators

  • Higher School of Economics

    Faculty of Computer Science (http://cs.hse.ru/en/) trains developers and researchers. The programme has been created based on the experience of leading American and European universities, such as Stanford University (U.S.) and EPFL (Switzerland). Also taken into consideration when creating the faculty was the School of Data Analysis, which is one of the strongest postgraduate schools in the field of computer science in Russia. In the faculty, learning is based on practice and projects.

    National Research University - Higher School of Economics (HSE) is one of the top research universities in Russia. Established in 1992 to promote new research and teaching in economics and related disciplines, it now offers programs at all levels of university education across an extraordinary range of fields of study including business, sociology, cultural studies, philosophy, political science, international relations, law, Asian studies, media and communications, IT, mathematics, engineering, and more. Learn more on www.hse.ru

  • University of California, San Diego

    UC San Diego is an academic powerhouse and economic engine, recognized as one of the top 10 public universities by U.S. News and World Report. Faculty at the Computer Science and Engineering Department at UCSD are among the leaders in the field of algorithms, bioinformatics, cryptography, machine learning, and many other areas of computer science.

    UC San Diego is an academic powerhouse and economic engine, recognized as one of the top 10 public universities by U.S. News and World Report. Innovation is central to who we are and what we do. Here, students learn that knowledge isn't just acquired in the classroom—life is their laboratory.

  • Vladimir Podolskii

    Vladimir Podolskii

    Associate Professor
  • Michael Levin

    Michael Levin

    Lecturer
  • Alexander S. Kulikov

    Alexander S. Kulikov

    Visiting Professor

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